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Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions About Permanent Residents

Replacing Green cards


Lost/Forgotten Green cards


Maintaining Permanent Resident Status


Change of Address

Child Born Subsequent to the Issuance of an Immigrant Visa

Child Born Abroad to Legal Permanent Resident (LPR)


 
My Legal Permanent Resident (LPR) Card (Green Card) is about to expire. Can I file Form I-90 at the Embassy?

No. If you are outside the United States and your green card will expire within six months (but you will return within one year of your departure from the United States and before the card expires), you should file Form I-90 for your renewal card as soon as you return to the United States.

My Green Card expired. I have been out of the United States for less than 12 months. Do I need a transportation letter?

Yes. You must have a “Boarding Foil” to return to the United States. Please see Lost, Stolen or Expired Green Card page for “Boarding Foil” processing.

Military members, U.S. government employees and their spouses and minor children may be exempted from the “Boarding Foil” requirements. Please see U.S. military family members page.

See Returning Residents

See Conditional Residents if you have CR-1 status

See Expired/expiring Green Card

I came to Japan while in the process of extending my Green Card. I have not received it. Can I return to the United States?

If you left the United States less than one year ago and your passport has a valid Alien Documentation and Identification System (ADIT) stamp (temporary evidence of resident status), you may apply for admission to the United States at the port of entry. If you do not have an unexpired ADIT stamp, you will need a “Boarding Foil” in your passport. Please see Lost, Stolen or Expired Green Card page.

I applied for a Green Card but have not yet received it. What should I do?

If you have your receipt number, you should contact the USCIS case status service online or call the National Customer Service Center (NCSC).

When file a Form I-90 for replacement of green card, it is required to submit biometrics. Can I take my biometrics at the US Embassy or consulates in Japan?

No, The US Embassy or consulates in Japan cannot take biometrics for this purpose. If you have any questions concerning these procedures, please contact USCIS directly.

 I lost my Green Card. What should I do?

First, you are required to report the loss of your Green Card to the local police authorities.
If you are in Japan, you should apply for a "Boarding Foil" at the Embassy in Tokyo or Consulate-Generals in Osaka or Naha. For information on "Boarding Foil", see the Lost, Stolen or Expired Green Card page.

I forgot my Green Card in the United States. What should I do?

First, you are required to report the loss of your Green Card to the local police authorities. If you are in Japan, you should apply for a “Boarding Foil” at the Embassy in Tokyo or Consulate-Generals in Osaka or Naha. For information on “Boarding Foil”, see the Lost, Stolen or Expired Green Card page.

I expect to be outside of the United States for more than 12 months. What should I do?

If you plan to be outside of the United States for more than 12 months, you should apply for a re-entry permit before leaving the United States. You will be required to file Form I-131, Application for a Travel Document/Re-entry Permit with USCIS. A re-entry permit is normally valid for up to 2 years and shows that you are returning from a temporary visit abroad. You will be required to show the re-entry permit at the port of entry when you enter the United States.

Information for U.S. military family members.

I have a valid re-entry permit but my passport has expired (or is lost). Can I still return to the United States?

Although you may return to the United States without a passport if you have a valid re-entry permit, you may be required to show your passport when leaving the foreign country you are in.

I did not apply for a re-entry permit before leaving the United States and it has been more than one year since I left the U.S. What should I do?

If you did not apply for a re-entry permit before leaving the United States and have been overseas for more than 12 months, it is possible that your LPR status has lapsed. You may need to undergo the entire immigrant visa process anew. See Returning Resident (SB-1).

Information for U.S. military family members.

My re-entry permit will expire shortly. Can I get a new one in the United States? How many times will they issue me a new re-entry permit?

There is no limit on the number of times you apply for a re-entry permit. Whether your application is approvable will be dtermined by USCIS.

Can I file for a re-entry permit with the Embassy?

Form I-131 can only be filed in the United States with USCIS.

When file a Form I-131 for re-entry permit, it is required to submit biometrics. Can I take my biometrics at the US Embassy or consulates in Japan?

No, The US Embassy or consulates in Japan cannot take biometrics for this purpose. If you have any questions concerning these procedures, please contact USCIS directly.


I entered the United States on an immigrant visa. My address changed before I received my Green Card. What should I do?

Contact the USCIS.


I/My spouse gave birth to a child subsequent to the issuance of the immigrant visa. What do I need a to do before going to the U.S.?


Your child is not required to obtain an immigrant visa to travel to the U.S. provided that*:
  • The child was born subsequent to the issuance of an immigrant visa to his or her accompanying parent.
  • the child's admission to the U.S will be within the validity of such a visa. 


Please make sure before you begin the travel to the United States that you have all required documents for your child and yourself that will allow you to board the plane and then be legally admitted to the United States.  


You should have:
  • an immigrant visa of the parent to travel to the U.S.
  • valid passports for both the parent and the child; and,
  • the child’s birth certificate listing both mother and the father. (An English translation must be accompanied with the birth certificate, if the original document is not in English.)

*Pursuant to 8 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations of the United States of America), Section 211.1(b)(1):

(1) A waiver of the visa required in paragraph (a) of this section shall be granted without fee or application by the district director, upon presentation of the child's birth certificate, to a child born subsequent to the issuance of an immigrant visa to his or her accompanying parent who applies for admission during the validity of such a visa; or a child born during the temporary visit abroad of a mother who is a lawful permanent resident alien, or a national, of the United States, provided that the child 's application for admission to the United States is made within 2 years of birth, the child is accompanied by the parent who is applying for readmission as a permanent resident upon the first return of the parent to the United States after the birth of the child, and the accompanying parent is found to be admissible to the United States.


Pursuant to 9 FAM (Foreign Affairs Manual of the United States), Section 42.1 N1.1 “Child Born After Issuance of Visa to Parent”: 

The child born after the issuance of a visa to a parent is not required to have a visa if the child is:

(1) Born subsequent to issuance of an immigrant visa to the accompanying parent within the validity of the parent’s immigrant visa; or

(2) Born during the permanent resident mother’s temporary visit abroad provided that;

(a) Admission is within two years of birth; and

(b) Either accompanying parent is applying for readmission upon first return after the birth of the child.


I am a U.S. Legal Permanent Resident (LPR). While I was outside the U.S., I gave birth to a child. What do I need to do before returning to the U.S.?

Your child is not required to obtain an immigrant visa to travel to the U.S. provided that*:

  • he or she was born during the LPR mother’s temporary visit abroad,
  • the child's admission to the U.S will be within two years of birth, and
  • the accompanying LPR parent (mother or father) is making his/her first entry into the U.S. since the child’s birth.  


Please make sure before you begin the travel to the United States that you have all required documents for your child and yourself that will allow you to board the plane and then be legally admitted to the United States.  


You should have:
  • a valid alien registration card (‘green card’) OR a valid U.S. re-entry permit OR an SB-1(Returning Resident) immigrant visa to travel to the U.S.
  • evidence that you are a Lawful Permanent Resident and have been outside the United States for less than one year, (or less than two years if you are in possession of a valid re-entry permit) note: This does not apply to SB-1 immigrant visa travelers.
  • valid passports for both the LPR parent and the child; and,
  • the child’s birth certificate listing both mother and the father. (An English translation must be accompanied with the birth certificate, if the original document is not in English.)

*Pursuant to 8 CFR (Code of Federal Regulations of the United States of America), Section 211.1(b)(1):

(1) A waiver of the visa required in paragraph (a) of this section shall be granted without fee or application by the district director, upon presentation of the child's birth certificate, to a child born subsequent to the issuance of an immigrant visa to his or her accompanying parent who applies for admission during the validity of such a visa; or a child born during the temporary visit abroad of a mother who is a lawful permanent resident alien, or a national, of the United States, provided that the child 's application for admission to the United States is made within 2 years of birth, the child is accompanied by the parent who is applying for readmission as a permanent resident upon the first return of the parent to the United States after the birth of the child, and the accompanying parent is found to be admissible to the United States.


Pursuant to 9 FAM (Foreign Affairs Manual of the United States), Section 42.1 N1.1 “Child Born After Issuance of Visa to Parent”: 

The child born after the issuance of a visa to a parent is not required to have a visa if the child is:

(1) Born subsequent to issuance of an immigrant visa to the accompanying parent within the validity of the parent’s immigrant visa; or

(2) Born during the permanent resident mother’s temporary visit abroad provided that;

(a) Admission is within two years of birth; and

(b) Either accompanying parent is applying for readmission upon first return after the birth of the child.